Blogs

Soul Laughter - Project Free Your Mind in Kenya

IMG_0592.jpg
IMG_1006.jpg

Such beautiful words from our partner clown, Antoine, from Clowner Utan Granser about our recent trip to Kenya for Project Free Your Mind...

When Going to the Hospital is Good News - Update from Kenya

Mandela1.jpg
Mandela2.jpg

Kenyatta International Hospital, Kenya - When going to the Hospital is Good News

African red earth, Marabou Storks, traffic jams (that makes Joburg feel like the countryside in peak hour), sugar cane, the delicious local food, bright smiles and open hearts are a few of my fleeting impressions of my time spent in Kenya – oh – and not to forget the clowns!

Update from Kenya - Project Free Your Mind

Clowns Without Borders has been working in Kenya since last year, collaborating with Hand in Hand East Africa on their Young Mother’s Project (http://handinhand-ea.org). So far we have been training their trainers in interactive and emotionally responsive facilitation techniques – workshops which have been dubbed by the participants “Project: Free Your Mind”. You can read more about this wonderful project here: http://www.cwbsa.org/node/329

Now, for the first time in this collaboration, Clowns from South Africa, Sweden and Kenya have come together to share joy and laughter through performances in the areas Hand in Hand works in.

Building a Rondavel of Support for Families in Cape Town - News from Sinovuyo

IMG_5406.JPG

Khayelitsha, Cape Town - For the past 12 weeks, Clowns Without Borders has been implementing the Sinvouyo Caring Families Programme with vulnerable families affected by HIV/AIDS, intimate partner violence, and poverty.

Borderless clowns - Update from Project Lithe'tha

Borderless, endless, without political agenda or motivation, with no prejudice or favor without a limit as to whom it will reach, Clowns Without Borders South Africa is bringing social interventions to the human community.

maJobe meets maJobe - Update from National Deaf Education Tour

Feedback Kwathintwa2.png
SNV37120.JPG

Hello! Phumzile Sitole here!  Aka – maJobe. Mthiyane. Maphita.

Those are my praise names. I’m Zulu and in the past two weeks have enjoyed bringing joy to the people that decorate the naturally beautiful landscape of KwaZulu Natal. The communities, in particular the children, decorate this land with their array of smiles, hope, dried snot, bright eyes and most importantly – their melodic laughter. This tour has been a privilege and the experiences I will take away with me are thoroughly special.

Playtime Antics! - Update from National Deaf Education Tour

SNV37328.JPG

 

Best. Show. Ever.

It's 4am and I'm wide awake. I have just had a dream where I am late for a gig and don't have a costume and I'm running around stressed out of my mind. For some reason this seems to have made me not want to get back to sleep. I do manage to drop off again but still wake up before my alarm. I seem to have fallen into a rural rhythm. I stumble off to the shower and get ready for another day of shows out here in rural KZN.

Project Lithe'tha - A week of clowning for HIV education and gender sensitivity

Lithetha blog3.png
Lithetha blog2.png
Lithetha blog3.jpg
Lithetha blog2.jpg

Hamburg, Eastern Cape – Today marks my first week of being in the Eastern Cape with the Clowns Without Borders South Africa. While they have a 3 week journey behind them including rehearsals and acquainting themselves with the community, I come as an intern not quite sure what to expect. Stepping off the bus in Eastern London, I am battered and bruised from a 10 hour long drive and the team working on the Lithe’tha Project in Hamburg, Eastern Cape patiently await me with posters. I am glad to be picked up but also to be welcomed so warmly, hugs and smiles.

Project Lithe'tha - Clowns on the Road

Image 5.jpg
Image 4.jpg
Image 6.jpg

The first week of our performance began with a bang!!! Although we did our ‘test show’ on Friday, we were still a bit nervous about how the children would respond to the show. Monday morning @7:30 the clowns were on the road. At the first school, they found the principal and the staff were so welcoming.